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Viking vs Miele 30 Inch Induction Cooktops (Reviews/Ratings/Prices)

Stan Pendrak  |  May 04, 2016  |  3 Min. Read

Induction Cooktops  |  Miele  |  Viking

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For many years, gas was the preferred cooking method because it was hotter and less heat-retentive than traditional electric (non-induction) cooking. Today, induction is becoming an increasingly preferred method of cooking due to faster boiling time, easiness to clean, and incredibly low simmer.

miele induction cooktop 30 inch KM5753 installed

Induction is better than gas for a variety of reasons. So we'll look at the benefits of induction cooking first then compare two new induction cooktops from Viking and Miele.

What is Induction?

Induction uses magnetic friction to transfer energy from the cooking surface to your pots and pans to create heat. Unlike other forms of cooking, the pan actually does the cooking. When you remove your cookware from the surface, the cooktop will cool down quickly as it does not technically heat up.

Because induction uses magnets to cook, you need to make sure your pots and pans are magnetic. If a magnet will stick to the bottom of your cookware, you’re all set to start cooking with induction.

I am now seeing more consumers move toward this option because it is quite simply a better option for your family than either gas or electric.

Advantages of Induction

There are many advantages to choosing induction cooking for you, like faster boiling times, better simmers and safety. Other benefits of induction are less heat emission, so venting is much easier. You can also downdraft an induction cooktop, unlike a higher BTU professional gas unit. 

It's great for families because children cannot turn on an induction cooktop, if there aren't any magnetic pans left on the burners. This is a great safety feature especially if you are forgetful like me, or have children that like to help you make dinner. 

Watch how quickly water boils in this video:

 

Let's now look at Viking, Miele and then compare their latest products.

Viking

Viking is an family-owned, American built company based out of Greenwood, Mississippi and was founded by Fred Carl Jr. in the early 1980’s. The “Viking” name over the years has been synonymous with professional ranges.

In 2012, the company was taken over by Middleby Corporation of Elgin, IL. Viking is now considered not only a major appliance manufacturer but a culinary company involved in all aspects of the kitchen and the world of food and wine.

Viking has had their fair share of ups and downs especially with quality control, service and innovation. However, we still like the line. To be transparent, we do not sell any Viking products at Yale.

Miele

Miele is the largest family owned appliance company based out of Germany. They are best known for the superior quality of their products. Miele products are designed, tested, and manufactured exclusively in Germany. This devotion to quality translates to a longer appliance life. In fact, Miele is the least serviced major brand of appliances sold at Yale.

Until recently, Viking and Miele were very similar companies. Viking was more of a professional gas cooking company. Miele has always been very strong in dishwashers and laundry with an emphasis on wall ovens and cooktops for cooking.

In 2014, Miele produced their first professional range. Last year, Viking improved their induction line, so they are more active competitors.

Let's see who has the best induction cooktop.

Miele vs. Viking Induction Cooktops

Miele KM6365 - $2,499

Features:

  • Clean professional look with black ceramic glass with stainless frame
  • Automatic cookware feature detects cookware
  • Power levels 1-9 with touch screen digital display
  • Child safety lock and safety switch-off
  • Booster feature to enhance boil
  • Overheating protection, residual heat indicator
  • 4 Cooking Zones
  • 1 variable zone of 4" - 6"
  • 2 variable zones of 6" - 9"
  • 1 variable zone of 7" - 11"
  • PowerFlex zone of 9" x 15" (two zones combined) up to 7,700W
  • 30” - (1) 1900W (2) 2600W each (1) 3850W

Viking VICU5304BST - $3,889

VIC5304BST-1.png

Features:

  • Updated beveled edge design provides sleek styling and easy cleaning
  • All glass ceramic surface is easy to clean and durable
  • Child-proof, push-to-turn metal knobs for safe use
  • Element lights indicate hot surfaces and active elements
  • Sensor turns off element if cookware is not detected within 60 seconds
  • Power Management System provides a boost of superior power on all elements for faster boiling
  • 30” with (4) 9" burners with 2,300 watt / 3,700 watt boost

Comparison

Do you prefer touch screen versus knob control? If you like the look and the clean lines of a touch control then the Miele is a great option to consider. It's also very easy to clean. The Viking has knobs on your cooktop and offers some benefits, especially for those individuals who are less comfortable with touch screen technology.

The key to any cooktop is the ability to heat and simmer. Induction products simmer almost identically, but Miele is more powerful with two 2,600 watt elements and one 3,850 watt compared to 2,300 watt for the Viking.

If you are looking for sheer power the Miele would be your choice, as it has the flexibility to achieve a combined wattage of 7,700 watts.

Miele is the most powerful cooktop on the market by almost 2,700 watts.

Final Thoughts

I like Viking. It's a line you should consider. However, the induction comparison is a bit one sided. Miele is less expensive and way more powerful. 

It's also statistically far more reliable at under 10% repair within the first year. When we parted with Viking in 2013, the rate of repair was well over 50%.

Miele is a better choice.

Related Articles

Additional Resources

Download the Yale Induction Cooking Buying Guide with features, outputs of every induction cooking products and inside buying tips. Over 155,000 people have read a Yale Guide.

View our induction cooking buying guide

WHY SHOULD YOU TRUST US?

A few review sites have placed this at the bottom of their articles. So here is our take: Our mission is to find reliable products for you to buy. Other review sites may say this as well.

However, we don’t love every product. Quite frankly, it costs us way too much money in repair costs to support less reliable brands.

In fact, we sell fewer brands than most appliance stores. Here is why:

We feel it is our responsibility to repair your appliances after you buy them.

We now have 30 service technicians, each averaging 8-10 calls a day Monday through Friday, plus another 110 on Saturday. That's over 30,000 service calls logged in one year.

The labor rates of fixing an appliance do not come close to the true cost in any product’s warranty period.

That is why no major retailer has a service department. It costs too much labor, money and time.

Our Blog is a bit different than most others you will read. We cannot write glowing reviews of unreliable products.

Hopefully, the bloggers and organizations who write such glowing product reviews for every brand consider servicing these products first. Only then they will understand the consequences of their marketing.

Stan Pendrak

Stan Pendrak is an Appliance Sales Consultant at Yale Appliance in Hanover. Stan has over 25 years of sales experience within the hospitality and appliance industry. Stan’s passion is to provide exceptional appliance sales and service solutions to everyone. In his spare time, Stan enjoys golfing and yoga.

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A Note About Pricing

Pricing on this blog is for reference only and may include time sensitive rebates. We make every attempt to provide accurate pricing at time of publishing. Please call the stores for most accurate price.

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